Michael Rupp
@Hypolite Petovan since you are to my knowledge one of the most insider people of the Friendica system, I thought posting this to you wouldn't be a bother.

I don't know if this is already on the Friendica to-do list, but at about 9:21 or so in @Anubis2814 's video below, he said something about automated account migration.

It sounds really cool to me but its just a stub idea. Imagine something like rank-choice-voting where a user picks a next of kin server to go to if the operator of the one they are on wants to shutter the operation. Admin clicks a migration button and users with a predefined next-of-kin server choice get moved. It's a fun idea.
Hypolite Petovan
Hi Michael, it’s an attractive idea on its face, but a single user account can weigh several hundreds of megabytes between posts and pictures, so an automated migration could quickly overwhelm both the source server and destination server(s). The accounts may also include unused ones or reshare bots that shouldn’t be moved automatically either.

In my opinion the best solution still is to trust each individual users with moving their account and admins to give their active users enough time to do so.
Anubis2814
Yeah its too bad the instances can't be set up to be backed up on redundant instances, similar to how big tech companies do it. Perhaps people who can't run an instance themselves could be a slower repository just for storage backup. If someone's drive craps out like mine did once, all our data is kaput, which is why I'm not going to even think about running an instance til I am sure there is nothing stopping me from keeping it up for good,, and I have enough storage for a backup drive in case one dies.. Also I've had like my peertube account just collapse on me which is really frustrating as the user just decided without telling anyone they lost interest or something and converted their instance to a personal one. a redundant backup in case of say health crisis of the person running the instance would allow people to migrate their data, even if it was slowly, from the backup system(s).
Michael Rupp to Atheists in the open via wall-to-wall:
Sam Harris has a point, begging for the counter-points...
I believe that mentioning # name in mixed company can push # # on almost all people who have heard of him, or heard some of him, and even so for some people who have heard most of him. I think I know why that happens, but it's not why I am writing this. I have heard so much from him directly that I earnestly believe he is always ready to be wrong and change based on new evidence. However, he makes really strong cases for what he thinks, so if you disagree with what he is saying while he is saying it, you get the feeling that you are in a philosophical life or death struggle. I don't anymore because I have heard a sufficient amount of his spoken thoughts. I respect him a lot.

In his recent episode of # "Can We Pull Back From The Brink?" (which seems to be a hot-take), he dispassionately discusses scale & judgment relative to the latest # and # work—in earnest—hoping to find a way to make things better in a rational way. Give it a listen, please, maybe jot down notes so you don't let the good be the enemy of the bad.




What follows below is my reaction to his podcast above.

Regarding his "proximate cause" for the civil & uncivil unrest, I'd like to argue this is more accurate than Sam's claim.
#, # #, # & # | The Daily Social Distancing Show


Regarding his "if you think a society without cops is a society you would want to live in, you have lost your mind" part, I'm feeling a false dichotomy happening there. I'm no fan of # ideals because they like # don't present ideas that I can see as # or ideally doing the most good for the most people, but I agree with them in that what we are doing now isn't convincingly better.

Sam poses a world without cops vs. a world as it is. What about a world with different cops whos publicized mission matches their hidden agendas, and that type of police force is agreeable to the local public in a very democratic and constitutional-rights respecting way with real accountability for their actions?

Sam idealized "giving a # on # to the state" which if things weren't as they really are I could understand, but the reality is from the start we gave a monopoly on violence to a # chosen type of like-minded individuals who's direction came from only the # of #. # and # # are far more like the depiction in A Clockwork Orange than they are in Blue Bloods. Sure, #, but it's supposed to be an ideal, a higher standard, and that is definitely not met.

It's also hard to know if my own # makes me feel the need to post this because Sam can say something in one in a sentence that makes me think of a rebuttal, and in the next sentence he will vindicate my thoughts, although I didn't hear it because of the distraction caused by the first sentence. Sam oddly uses some extreme examples of things that happened like firings from "woke-culture" for non-incidents to make his points—granted they were on the mass media so they have the power to cause # # to be produced from thin air—but later in the podcast, he decided to claim the extremes causing the uprising were too # # to justify the results on the ground. Not cool. Firings of well-to-do people for lousy reasons, bad, the # of black people for lousy reasons, not a significant thing statistically.

Sam, relative to #, reminds me of the dad-type who is harder on his own child than the rest of the world because he cares more about his own kid.

I'm not sure who Sam was listening to in general on the topic linked to # to form his positions, but I think # with # does a far better job covering the concept than Sam did in his #.
What Does It Mean to Defund or Abolish the Police?


Around 37 minutes in Sam starts to talk about the progress we have made with # in the #, and his points are valid, but I feel like the bright picture he presented was a sentence fragment that begged to be completed. A two-term black # (which Sam mentions), with the backlash of a # (which he failed to juxtapose), and all that it has wrought since is not what I would consider a net gain in # #.

Somebody who recently made this point, and is of better of recent notoriety than I, is Kimberly Jones. She eloquently states my position.
How Can We Win?


Sam goes on to justifiably suss out the difference between real and perceived patterns; the plural of anecdotal evidence is not data. A recent episode of Invisibilia agrees with him to some degree about how we can see a pattern where there isn't one because we have become # by # of #.
Trust Fall


He makes a lot of good points to shore up the mental space a # might be stuck with based on what they experienced or were told by their superiors in the routine precinct meetings, but he didn't—to my liking—shore up the reasons why people economically below the middle-class citizen are also stuck in a mental space determining their actions based on their personal experience and that of their community. Change both their environments and cultures, and you'll change their actions. I'll offer a few places to find reasons to see things through the eyes of others if you haven't been out of your suburban cul-de-sac to find it out for yourself.





Later on, around 1:15:10 time mark, Sam starts to do a thing where he sees a statistical anomaly and without a good-enough theory of why there is an anomaly, he assumes things that I perceive as assumptions that are culturally forced on him based on his likely experiences to date.

His statement of, "we're talking about career criminals", to categorize police shootings as justifiable is a tip-off that the data is trusted on its face, and it bothers me that there is no acknowledgment that the path of a person who was cultured into being a "career criminal" could have started with a bogus arrest for marijuana consumption. People who haven't been flushed by the system think merits can save you. I, a white person from the middle-class, had many run-ins with the police where I undeservedly was let off the hook with a warning, and no records of mine were permanently kept in the system.
America Loves to Jail | I Love You, America on Hulu

Sarah on Her Criminal Past | I Love You, America on Hulu


Also, also, people without stuff may crime to survive, where people with means most likely crime to entertain themselves.

He mentions how Officer to Suspect interactions of the same race are more likely to be #. Like what if a like-race-category on the PD has more to prove to their coworkers when confronting a like-race-category "suspect". Since the incident of how PD's retaliate on anybody that crosses them in a cult-like way, e.g. the dismissal of LAPD's Chris Dorner the recently uncovered Buffalo PD case of Cariol Horne, it is very plausible that race discrimination or tacit racism pervasive in the PD's causes it the way a sidewalk in disrepair causes a bone injury. Did we even check to see if there's a bias in reporting where non-white officers are more likely to report things #? # # would come down hard on non-white employees and be forgiving of white employees.
8:46 - Dave Chappelle


He then jumps to a hypothesis that because blacks are more likely to # an # because of real or perceived systematic racism problem, "the only response is for the police to increase their use of force". Damn Sam. That's the only choice they have? Like de-escalation techniques never worked? Like the way patrolling went in the months and years before the incident has nothing to do with how things go down? The cop's only choice was that. Sorry Sam, I reject your null hypothesis.

Maybe black on black violence outside police to non-police interactions wouldn't be so high if there wasn't a clear signal from the system that blacks don't matter to the police, and their bullshit arrests or stops & frisks are randomly distributed to make tally sheets on clipboards look right for municipal reporting. If an innocent black person was shaken down without # # and no tangible #, will they later call the cops when a local criminal act by a black person is being committed? If you are a skilled black criminal, will you cut in some of the local police on the action you are running? Any cop that don't give a fuck about black people would give a fuck more about a black person helping his kid get through college with side money. In the # Podcast linked above the Chicago PD's local precinct office couldn't find Courtney Copeland's killer with the evidence handed to them on a silver platter, I—personally—can only assume the cops are the mob.

Somewhere around 1:30:00 we hit a concept of what kind of people would want to be cops in such a # # #. "Who's gonna want to be a cop now?" Ugh! This smacks of, the only people that care about privacy are people doing something wrong, I ain't got nothing to hide. He further postulates that only prison guard type people will want to be cops. #. Maybe if good people didn't think they were going to be gang-land retaliated against for doing the # # thing, they might take a chance on being a cop. If whistle-blowers didn't know by past examples that it would end all their # # in one fell swoop, there might be more people doing good things for the world. Where's Reality Winner now? Our # # propagated by those in power is #, and to extend the metaphor, many of us still think # is good for their health. I would definitely want to go for it and become a cop if I didn't personally have reasons to see the PD's near me as corrupt from first and credible second-hand experiences.

Near the end, about 1:34:00, he's claiming the videos are warping our perception of the problem. I think in that he is putting the wrong weight on the value of loss and cascading ill-effects one police act of murder of a minority has on our country. We are supposed to be founded on all people are created equal, innocent until proven guilty, and so on.
What the Hell Happened This Week? | The Daily Social Distancing Show


Bear in mind, if I didn't mention something Sam said in his #, it's about a 99% chance I agreed with him.



!Atheists in the open
Michael Rupp
This adds on nicely to the "rant" above. Mike Pesca, in the first 5 minutes (the only part I care about for this context), outlines how holding for one variable in statistics tells a whole different story than the one Sam was rationally presenting.

Give Up That Racist Tradition


Michael Rupp
Sam Harris has a point, begging for the counter-points...

(Special note, this is a repost from https://nsfw.wnymathguy.com/display/27bb4d82-905e-e83a-53a4-24b331982239 because it somehow was only in the group's feed and not my main page.)

I believe that mentioning # name in mixed company can push # # on almost all people who have heard of him, or heard some of him, and even so for some people who have heard most of him. I think I know why that happens, but it's not why I am writing this. I have heard so much from him directly that I earnestly believe he is always ready to be wrong and change based on new evidence. However, he makes really strong cases for what he thinks, so if you disagree with what he is saying while he is saying it, you get the feeling that you are in a philosophical life or death struggle. I don't anymore because I have heard a sufficient amount of his spoken thoughts. I respect him a lot.

In his recent episode of # "Can We Pull Back From The Brink?" (which seems to be a hot-take), he dispassionately discusses scale & judgment relative to the latest # and # work—in earnest—hoping to find a way to make things better in a rational way. Give it a listen, please, maybe jot down notes so you don't let the good be the enemy of the bad.




What follows below is my reaction to his podcast above.

Regarding his "proximate cause" for the civil & uncivil unrest, I'd like to argue this is more accurate than Sam's claim.
#, # #, # & # | The Daily Social Distancing Show


Regarding his "if you think a society without cops is a society you would want to live in, you have lost your mind" part, I'm feeling a false dichotomy happening there. I'm no fan of # ideals because they like # don't present ideas that I can see as # or ideally doing the most good for the most people, but I agree with them in that what we are doing now isn't convincingly better.

Sam poses a world without cops vs. a world as it is. What about a world with different cops whos publicized mission matches their hidden agendas, and that type of police force is agreeable to the local public in a very democratic and constitutional-rights respecting way with real accountability for their actions?

Sam idealized "giving a # on # to the state" which if things weren't as they really are I could understand, but the reality is from the start we gave a monopoly on violence to a # chosen type of like-minded individuals who's direction came from only the # of #. # and # # are far more like the depiction in A Clockwork Orange than they are in Blue Bloods. Sure, #, but it's supposed to be an ideal, a higher standard, and that is definitely not met.

It's also hard to know if my own # makes me feel the need to post this because Sam can say something in one in a sentence that makes me think of a rebuttal, and in the next sentence he will vindicate my thoughts, although I didn't hear it because of the distraction caused by the first sentence. Sam oddly uses some extreme examples of things that happened like firings from "woke-culture" for non-incidents to make his points—granted they were on the mass media so they have the power to cause # # to be produced from thin air—but later in the podcast, he decided to claim the extremes causing the uprising were too # # to justify the results on the ground. Not cool. Firings of well-to-do people for lousy reasons, bad, the # of black people for lousy reasons, not a significant thing statistically.

Sam, relative to #, reminds me of the dad-type who is harder on his own child than the rest of the world because he cares more about his own kid.

I'm not sure who Sam was listening to in general on the topic linked to # to form his positions, but I think # with # does a far better job covering the concept than Sam did in his #.
What Does It Mean to Defund or Abolish the Police?


Around 37 minutes in Sam starts to talk about the progress we have made with # in the #, and his points are valid, but I feel like the bright picture he presented was a sentence fragment that begged to be completed. A two-term black # (which Sam mentions), with the backlash of a # (which he failed to juxtapose), and all that it has wrought since is not what I would consider a net gain in # #.

Somebody who recently made this point, and is of better of recent notoriety than I, is Kimberly Jones. She eloquently states my position.
How Can We Win?


Sam goes on to justifiably suss out the difference between real and perceived patterns; the plural of anecdotal evidence is not data. A recent episode of Invisibilia agrees with him to some degree about how we can see a pattern where there isn't one because we have become # by # of #.
Trust Fall


He makes a lot of good points to shore up the mental space a # might be stuck with based on what they experienced or were told by their superiors in the routine precinct meetings, but he didn't—to my liking—shore up the reasons why people economically below the middle-class citizen are also stuck in a mental space determining their actions based on their personal experience and that of their community. Change both their environments and cultures, and you'll change their actions. I'll offer a few places to find reasons to see things through the eyes of others if you haven't been out of your suburban cul-de-sac to find it out for yourself.





Later on, around 1:15:10 time mark, Sam starts to do a thing where he sees a statistical anomaly and without a good-enough theory of why there is an anomaly, he assumes things that I perceive as assumptions that are culturally forced on him based on his likely experiences to date.

His statement of, "we're talking about career criminals", to categorize police shootings as justifiable is a tip-off that the data is trusted on its face, and it bothers me that there is no acknowledgment that the path of a person who was cultured into being a "career criminal" could have started with a bogus arrest for marijuana consumption. People who haven't been flushed by the system think merits can save you. I, a white person from the middle-class, had many run-ins with the police where I undeservedly was let off the hook with a warning, and no records of mine were permanently kept in the system.
America Loves to Jail | I Love You, America on Hulu

Sarah on Her Criminal Past | I Love You, America on Hulu


Also, also, people without stuff may crime to survive, where people with means most likely crime to entertain themselves.

He mentions how Officer to Suspect interactions of the same race are more likely to be #. Like what if a like-race-category on the PD has more to prove to their coworkers when confronting a like-race-category "suspect". Since the incident of how PD's retaliate on anybody that crosses them in a cult-like way, e.g. the dismissal of LAPD's Chris Dorner the recently uncovered Buffalo PD case of Cariol Horne, it is very plausible that race discrimination or tacit racism pervasive in the PD's causes it the way a sidewalk in disrepair causes a bone injury. Did we even check to see if there's a bias in reporting where non-white officers are more likely to report things #? # # would come down hard on non-white employees and be forgiving of white employees.
8:46 - Dave Chappelle


He then jumps to a hypothesis that because blacks are more likely to # an # because of real or perceived systematic racism problem, "the only response is for the police to increase their use of force". Damn Sam. That's the only choice they have? Like de-escalation techniques never worked? Like the way patrolling went in the months and years before the incident has nothing to do with how things go down? The cop's only choice was that. Sorry Sam, I reject your null hypothesis.

Maybe black on black violence outside police to non-police interactions wouldn't be so high if there wasn't a clear signal from the system that blacks don't matter to the police, and their bullshit arrests or stops & frisks are randomly distributed to make tally sheets on clipboards look right for municipal reporting. If an innocent black person was shaken down without # # and no tangible #, will they later call the cops when a local criminal act by a black person is being committed? If you are a skilled black criminal, will you cut in some of the local police on the action you are running? Any cop that doesn't give a fuck about black people would give a fuck more about a black person helping his kid get through college with side money. In the # Podcast linked above the Chicago PD's local precinct office couldn't find Courtney Copeland's killer with the evidence handed to them on a silver platter, I—personally—can only assume the cops are the mob.

Somewhere around 1:30:00, we hit a concept of what kind of people would want to be cops in such a # # #. "Who's gonna want to be a cop now?" Ugh! This smacks of, the only people that care about privacy are people doing something wrong, I ain't got nothing to hide. He further postulates that only prison guard type people will want to be cops. #. Maybe if good people didn't think they were going to be gang-land retaliated against for doing the # # thing, they might take a chance on being a cop. If whistle-blowers didn't know by past examples that it would end all their # # in one fell swoop, there might be more people doing good things for the world. Where's Reality Winner now? Our # # propagated by those in power is #, and to extend the metaphor, many of us still think # is good for their health. I would definitely want to go for it and become a cop if I didn't personally have reasons to see the PD's near me as corrupt from first and credible second-hand experiences.

Near the end, about 1:34:00, he's claiming the videos are warping our perception of the problem. I think he is putting the wrong weight on the value of loss and cascading ill-effects one police act of murder of a minority has on our country. We are supposed to be founded on all people are created equal, innocent until proven guilty, and so on.
What the Hell Happened This Week? | The Daily Social Distancing Show


Bear in mind, if I didn't mention something Sam said in his #, it's about a 99% chance I agreed with him.


Michael Rupp
This adds on nicely to the "rant" above. Mike Pesca, in the first 5 minutes (the only part I care about for this context), outlines how holding for one variable in statistics tells a whole different story than the one Sam was rationally presenting.

Give Up That Racist Tradition


Michael Rupp
Slow Burn: David Duke
This episode was a roller-coaster of # from the # past. I'm not that young that I shouldn't be expected to know the David Duke history, but I guess I'm not racist enough to know and not marginalized enough to know either. If somebody had tried removing all cheese from America, I probably would have written an essay about it in elementary school.

Hearing the fun romp of the precarious up's and joyful down's of David Duke's early years was a fun time. Not BlacKkKlansman level but heading that way.

Slow Burn: David Duke | Season 4: Episode 2 "Robe and Ritual"


noreply@wnymathguy.com and Introduction Requests
Due to some acts of omission, or neglect, by the admin (thats me), people who opted for eMail notifications to Introduction Requests were not getting them. It was discovered Friendica had been sending them out as noreply@wnymathguy.com but that wasn't an existing account for eMail on the server. It still isn't, but I believe the SMTP handler for the system—MailGun—will now permit the outbound notifications from this Friendica instance.

If you discover that Introduction Requests made after this announcement did not subsequently send out an eMail notification and your settings are specifically set to have eMail notifications, please complain directly to me.
Michael Rupp
@Anubis2814 something electronically weird happened when I accepted your connection. I had it happen in the past with people on the social.isurf.ca server. Like right now I don't see your old posts on my feed, and I can't comment on your posts if I browse to them.

The remedy might be to both disconnect from each other by deleting from the contacts list and then on another day in the future try reconnecting.

I was going to comment on the hangings post. That's the kind of shit that rolls my eyes back in my head like when you get punched too hard and you are about to go unconsious.
Michael Rupp
Nevermind, I think my directly mentioning you cleared the queue.
Michael Rupp
1619
Damn, this short-run #, from the questionable NY Times, is ON!!!

It's jam-packed with mindboggling facts of # # from pre constitution to today. I hope it goes on to do more episodes.
Michael Rupp
@Bo Elder Love the name of your instance.
Michael Rupp
I'd be happy to argue about religion or politics come from that NSFW site, and happy to argue about economics or politics from this Social server.

Tap me in when you get rolling.
Michael Rupp
Yep, the Police can be very brutal in the USA 🇺🇸
More people than nobody do need to see it to believe it—# or it didn't happen. 🙄

# is # and #. When I'm in a more doubtful mood I think of it as a confluence of random events and human nature—Stanford Prison Experiment—that get us to a point that we're at right now, but when I'm more confident I see it as a # # part of the # of # by the # # like # Bros. designed specifically to keep the people in powerin power.

No matter what the driving force is behind our # and # #, it exists.

Seeing-as-how a couple days ago a down-to-Earth but established star like Anna Kendrick has started # about it, maybe you can pass it on to your # type relatives before # starts slandering her as an # # #, or the # / # types try to murder her.

I mean. They couldn’t stop themselves from blatantly escalating things. Even for a few days, even cynically, even for the optics.


Anna Kendrick (@AnnaKendrick47) May 31, 2020
2 people reshared this
Tessa Byrd
There are always folks who deny, justify, and excuse brutality though. Pictures and video recordings have traditionally been ignored. I say traditionally because law enforcement has been murdering unarmed cooperating Black men & women for AT LEAST a decade...
Digit
oh it's enough to laugh/cry. that understatement. at least a decade. yeah. just a bit. 🙁
Michael Rupp
Trevor Speaks Out About the Murder of George Floyd
Trevor Noah, of The Daily Show fame, had dropped the # persona and just talked as #, #, and # to the camera for about 20 minutes. It sounded to me like #. I found it in a few places after first digging it up on # last night. Please make the time to listen to it and pass it on.

Listen at Tune In radio which is embedded here


Its also available at Luminary, and available at Radio (dot) Net, and ... of course ... available on #.



# # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # # #
2 people reshared this
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